Mark Healey Surfs Possibly the Biggest Paddle-In Wave Ever at Puerto Escondido

Posted by on May 4, 2015 in Industry News, Spinksy's Blog, Surfer Poll Awards, Surfing, Surfing News, The Inertia | 0 comments

Puerto Escondido is flooded. The XXL surf is taking the streets of Mexico for one hell of a ride. Naturally, madman Mark Healey is a culprit, caught red-handed on the biggest bomb of the morning. The photo is mind-boggling. It’s a wave so big it challenges what is possible by paddle power alone. Just a day after the Big Wave Awards, Healey found himself right smack in the middle of one of the biggest days Puerto Escondido has seen in decades. And of course, Healey found himself right smack in the middle of one of the biggest waves of the day. “Today was honestly twice as big as the biggest I’ve ever seen it here,” he told Stab, who has his phone number. “The energy and the water moving was just… so beyond anything I’ve ever seen here. Everything else pales in comparison.” According to local big wave surfer Coco Nogales, it was the heaviest surf Mexico has seen in twenty years. And both eyewitnesses and big wave surfing aficionados are tossing around the phrase “biggest paddle-in wave ever” – and almost certainly at Puerto Escondido.   Share this: Like...

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Photographers Win Back Image Rights from ASP

Posted by on Mar 7, 2014 in Industry News, News, Spinksy's Blog, The Inertia | 0 comments

  World Championship Tour photographers can breathe a little easier now that they own their photos again. A recent change to one of the new ASP’s biggest hitches has been amended. When ZoSea took ownership of the Association of Surfing Professionals, they made a few very distinct changes. While most of them have seemed to be for the growth of the sport – one of the new ASP’s biggest goals – one change in particular seemed a tad harsh. Starting at at the first stop on the 2014 World Championship Tour, Snapper Rocks, tour photographers no longer owned any photos or video they took. As Snapper’s starting date drew closer, the ASP sent out emails for media accreditation.“I hereby assign in full the rights to all audio, visual, still image or moving content I generate at the Event (“the Content”) to ASP,” read the fine print at the bottom of the email   Which meant, essentially, that photographers were better off standing on the beach shooting with the regular folk snapping shots on their iPhones than they would be with a media pass. At the end of the day, an ASP representative was within their rights to take all of a photographer’s images and claim ASP ownership of them. ”It now makes no sense for me to shoot all day, because I don’t own my images at the end of it,” Peter “Joli” Wilson said in an interview with SwellNet. As you might imagine, this left a lot of photographers with a bit of a bad taste in their mouth. Peter “Joli” Wilson was one of them. Keep in mind that Joli is one of the most prolific surf photographers in the world. He’s been following the tour for around twenty years, and heavily involved in the surf industry for twice that. If you’ve ever even glanced at a surf mag, you’ve probably laid eyes on one of his images. And a few days ago, before the ASP’s change of heart, Joli was banned from media access at the Gold Coast event. “I’ve been shut down,” Joli said in an email a few days ago. “Denied access into the Quik Pro, so according to all the rules and regulations, as I am not accredited, I’m not allowed to shoot at Snapper.” According to the email, the interview with SwellNet ruffled a few ASP feathers. They called him up to talk about it, and Joli told him how he felt. “I expressed my concerns about the first line of the media accreditation that said if you signed up, you agreed to assign full rights over to them,” he wrote in the email. “As a freelancer, I don’t agree and consequently, I hadn’t signed up.” So they showed him the door at Snapper, and told him not to let it hit him on the way out. According to Joli, the ASP told him their media model is based...

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HEADSPACE: Kelly Slater, Pt. 2

Posted by on Feb 27, 2014 in News, Spinksy's Blog, The Inertia | 0 comments

The Inertia Distributor of Ideas “When I started to compete and see that was an expected image of a surfer, for me personally, I wanted to change that about myself. I didn’t want people to think that about me...I also didn’t want to have culture not respect surfers as people.” – Kelly Slater We told you it was coming. We just made you wait a little longer than we thought we’d have to. Apologies. We think it was worth the wait. As promised, Kelly Slater sits down with us and discusses plenty of things that are more interesting and more important than surfing. A little context wouldn’t hurt here, though. From the beginning, we wanted to do an interview with Kelly that reveals a glimpse into who he is as a person and how he thinks about and approaches issues in his life beyond surfing. Clearly, his excellence as a surfer and champion of our sport have largely defined our understanding and appreciation for him. But there are unique human qualities that define excellence and have enabled him to dominate his peers for such an extended period of time. They invite examination. Sure, technique, discipline and athleticism are indispensable ingredients in establishing athletic dynasties. Essential. But I submit that the most crucial factor contributing to the success of any iconic athlete is mental resolve. The body has limits. The mind, not so much. Which is why Kelly had the patience to indulge an interview touching on topics ranging from morality to politics to gun control to drugs in surfing to how he approaches the singular responsibility of representing our sport and culture to the world. He thinks for himself. As an example, in 2008 just a few months before America’s presidential election, I distinctly remember asking him (and all of the professional surfers who attended the 2008 Surfer Poll Awards), who they planned to vote for in the upcoming election. It was meant as a joke, although I was actually interested to hear their responses. Most shrugged or laughed or said Obama because they thought they were supposed to. But Kelly, without hesitating, said, “Cynthia McKinney.” Who? And he had all sorts of reasons as to why. Politics and politicians come and go, and I guarantee Kelly has a different opinion and set of political beliefs now. Much time has passed since this interview. But I also guarantee that his resolve to think independently about transcendent issues is unwavering. So now, for possibly the first time ever, here’s an opportunity to briefly get to know Kelly Slater, the person. Enjoy WATCH HEADSPACE: Kelly Slater Pt. 1 Share this: Like...

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HEADSPACE: Kelly Slater Pt. 1

Posted by on Feb 27, 2014 in News, Spinksy's Blog, The Inertia | 0 comments

The Inertia Distributor of Ideas “Go on the results of your actions. When everything’s all laid out, and it’s all done, what effect did you have on something? Positive or negative? How did you help it or hurt it? So I like to think of that. Go on results, with anything.” – Kelly Slater It’s fitting that when I ask Kelly Slater, the most dominant competitive surfer to ever live, about his guiding philosophy that he mentions the word results. Of course he would. He’s built a name, career, and enviable existence around something very simple: results. He has learned with unprecedented skill what he needs to do in order to get what he wants. That sounds opportunistic, but really it’s just savvy – and exceptionally difficult. But when Kelly mentioned results, it was outside the context of surfing. In fact, just a few minutes earlier he told me that he’d much rather discuss gun control, bullying, America’s knee-jerk response to 9/11, supply and demand in the global drug war, morality, and a host of other very interesting, unsolicited topics that he’s clearly been thinking about – for a while. “Those things are more interesting to me than talking about surfing,” said Kelly. “To me, that’s life, and that’s the world. And surfing’s just something we do when we have some free time. Those are more important debates for culture and society, and I’m just a citizen like anyone else when it comes down to it, and those are topics that interest me.” The dude just wanted to talk about something (anything) other than surfing. I would too. So we did. But you’ll have to wait until next week to hear that stuff. It’s good. In the first part of our two-part interview, which took place right after Kelly beat Dane at the US Open of Surfing in 2012, Kelly Slater discusses what it means to be included in the “The Greatest Athlete Ever” debate as well as his relationship with Andy Irons, his father, the future of Kelly Slater Wave Company, and words of wisdom that have kept him going. – WATCH HEADSPACE: Kelly Slater, Pt. 2 Share this: Like...

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Surfing in 2013: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Posted by on Jan 2, 2014 in Spinksy's Blog, The Inertia | 0 comments

Tetsuhiko Endo The Inertia Surf Editor   The Good Laird He’s like your inappropriate uncle who always manages to offend everyone in the room at Christmas dinner. He’s bitter, uncouth, and monomaniacal, but damn if he doesn’t say some really interesting things. Family get-togethers wouldn’t be the same without him. Safety Measures in Big Wave Surfing Enough near-death situations can convince even the hardest of heads that the odd contingency plan is a good idea. After years of turning away from modern gimmicks, like, you know, life vests, and uh CPR, the big wave community at large suppressed their egos and embraced new safety measures this year that include life vest and water safety training. At this rate, we might even see a professional wearing reef booties sometime this century. Probably not, though. The Unknown Surfer from Spirit of Akasha Among incredible performances by Stephanie Gilmore and Fergal Smith, Sam Yoon stole the show in the movie of the year, Andrew Kidman’s homage to Morning of the Earth, the obliquely titled Spirit of Akasha. Yoon shapes his own boards, rides with an old-school squat and can’t do an air to save his life. Despite, or maybe because of all this, his sections in the film are some of the best in the last decade. Four-foot-and-under Men Who Love the Occasional 60-Footer. If you are paid to make heats in competitions, or do airs for magazines and videos, it’s easy to post up at the pool bar when swell heights push passed twelve feet. But there are a few sick SOB’s who can’t help but do both, and we salute them: Kelly Slater, The brothers Gudauski, Adrian Buchan, John John Florence, Jeremy Flores, the Hobgoods and some I’m most definitely forgetting forgetting. These are among the few who have not forgotten that good surfers are good in every condition, not just when it’s head high and puntable. Socially Aware Surfers Surfers have a long and storied history of studiously ignoring any social ills that might impede their ability to get into the water – see apartheid in South Africa. It’s refreshing, then, to see a small but growing group leveraging their statuses and know-how to lead movements that stand for more than hedonism. Jon Rose is flying into disaster zones to deliver water filters to those in need, Dustin Barca, along with a supporting cast that includes Mark Healey and Kelly Slater, is leading the fight to get agribusiness to disclose what sort of pesticides they use in Hawaii, even the late Buttons Kaluhiokalani, a longtime drug abuser, became an open and vocal opponent of drug use until his death this year from cancer. If you are a gifted athlete, you don’t have to stand for anything. Maybe that’s why it’s so much cooler if you do. John John Florence When a child prodigy reaches adulthood without discernable psychological problems or issues with substance abuse, the...

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